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General LASIK FAQ

Lasik patients see clearly after receive laser vision correction at san diego lasik center

Below are some of the most frequently asked questions patients have about their vision and general eye health issues. If you have any other questions, or would like to schedule an appointment, we would love to hear from you.

Q: Who is a good candidate for LASIK at Global Laser Vision in San Diego?

A: Although it is impossible to determine if you are a good candidate without a consultation with one of our experienced doctors, good candidates are usually in good medical and ocular health. They have no eye disease and have a desire to decrease their dependence on glasses or contact lenses.

Q: What important factors do I need to look for when researching different Lasik surgeons?

A: It is very important to research different Lasik surgeons in your area prior to choosing an ophthalmologist. Many surgeons nowadays claim they hold the right qualifications to perform Lasik surgery when in reality they don’t. Key factors to look for in a trusted Lasik surgeon are they should be board certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology, attended an accredited corneal and refractive fellowship, hold training certifications of the proper Lasik equipment and have received the proper credentials to perform refractive eye surgery. Reference Dr. Yaghouti’s Curriculum Vitae.

Q: Does LASIK or Laser Vision Correction correct nearsightedness (Myopia)?

A: Yes, the lasers we use at Global laser Vision are FDA approved for treatment of nearsightedness with or without astigmatism.

Q: Does LASIK or Laser Vision Correction correct farsightedness (Hyperopia)?

A: Absolutely, The lasers we use at Global laser Vision are FDA approved for treatment of Farsightedness with or without astigmatism

Q: Can astigmatism be treated with LASIK or Laser Vision Correction?

A: Absolutely! Since FDA’s approval of astigmatism followed its approval of nearsightedness, that created a common misperception amongst many patients that astigmatism cannot be corrected by LASIK! Astigmatism can indeed be treated by laser vision correction and is and FDA approved indication for the use of lasers used at Global laser Vision.

Q: Can I be considered to be too old to have Laser vision correction or LASIK?

A: Although there is no upper limit of age when it comes to LASIK surgery, certain medical conditions which may be associated with older age must be ruled out prior to considering LASIK. That one of the reasons for the examination to determine candidacy prior to LASIK. During your consultation, Dr. Yaghouti or one of the other doctors of Global Laser Vision will perform a complete examination to rule out conditions such significant cataracts, or other eye conditions which may preclude the patient from being a perfect candidate for LASIK.

Q: Can I be too young to have LASIK or Laser Vision Correction?

A: Stability of the prescription is the main point when it comes to the youngest age for refractive surgery. For CustomVue Lasik, FDA’s recommendation is that you are at least 21 years of age.

Q: How does pregnancy affect LASIK?

A: While you are pregnant the body continues to be under significant hormonal influence which may affect the healing of the eyes. Our doctors recommendations are to wait at least for one month and ideally for three months following giving birth to have LASIK.

Q: Why can’t I have LASIK if I am still breast feeding?

A: During breastfeeding as in pregnancy, the body continues to be under significant hormonal influence which may affect the healing of the eyes. Our doctors recommendations are to wait at least for one month and ideally for three months following the last day of breast feeding to have LASIK.

Q: Can I have LASIK if I am taking Accutane?

A: Accutane can lead to significant dryness of the eyes. Our recommendation is to stop Accutane for 3 months prior to LASIK. During your examination, we will determine if there is any significant dryness of the eyes present to be addressed prior to LASIK procedure.

Q: I have a history of Keloids. Can that affect the result of my LASIK surgery?

A: A Keloid is a raised scar caused by an over active tissue repair process following a skin injury or trauma to the skin. Keloid formation is a relative contraindication to PRK (photorefractive Keratotomy) but not to LASIK. Since 1999, we have performed LASIK on many patients with history of Keloids without any problems.

Q: How long do I have to be out of my contact lenses prior to my Laser Vision Correction or LASIK surgery in San Diego?

A: It depends on the type of contact lens: For Soft Contact lenses a minimum of 4 days. For Toric Contact lenses, a minimum of 2 weeks and for rigid gas permeable contact lenses (RGP), a minimum of 3 weeks out of contact lenses is required. If we see any abnormality induced by the contact lenses on the mapping of the cornea obtained on the day of your examination prior to the procedure, we may extend that duration until a normal corneal map can be obtained.

Q: What is the reason for having the contact lenses out for a period of time prior to the LASIK in San Diego office?

A: The contact lens has the potential of changing the shape of your cornea temporarily. Prior to LASIK or other Laser Vision Corrections, we need the corneas to return to their normal shape for accurate measurements.

Q: How long after LASIK can I play sports?

A: The main concern with any sports following LASIK is the chance of trauma to the eyes. In general, any contact sports where there is a chance of direct trauma to the eye should either be avoided for a total of 3 months following lasik or the patient should protect the eyes against any trauma utilizing sports goggles during that period. As for non-contact sports where there is less of a chance of injury, as long as common sense precautions are followed, the patient can return to those activities the next day following LASIK. Many professional athletes have had LASIK: Tiger Woods, Tom Kuyt, Scott Hoch, Hale Irwin, Tom Kite, Mike Weir, Greg Maddux, Wade Boggs, Fred McGriff, Jeff Bagwell, Jeff Cirillo, Jeff Conine, Jose Cruz Jr., Wally Joyner, Mark Redman, Larry Walker, Troy Glaus, NFL players Troy Aikman, Ray Buchanan, Tiki Barber, Wayne Chrebet, Danny Kanell, NBA stars Amare Stoudemire and Rip Hamilton, and former LA Lakers Rick Fox and Kurt Rambis, Shaun Phillips, Pat Summerall, and Preston Pearson are to name a few.

Q: Can I have LASIK if I engage in sports with high risk for eye trauma?

A: If you engage in sports where there is a high chance for direct trauma to your eyes, LASIK would not be a good choice. In those cases, we would discuss PRK as a potential option for you.

Q: I am a Boxer. Can I have LASIK?

A: In sports such as boxing there is a high chance for direct trauma to your eyes. LASIK for Boxers is not a good option. In those athletes, we would discuss PRK as a potential alternative to LASIK.

Q: What are some of the contraindications to having LASIK?

A: Thin corneas.
Some types of abnormalities in the corneas.
Unrealistic expectations.
Some active medical conditions.

Q: Are the majority of patients coming to Global laser Vision in San Diego good candidates for Laser refractive procedures or LASIK?

A: Yes, most people are good candidates. However, ultimately your candidacy for the procedure will be determined during your consultation at Global Laser Vision in San Diego

Q: Can I have LASIK if I take Imitrex?

A: Imitrex is a medication used to treat Migraine. Even though taking Imitrex is not an absolute contraindication to having LASIK done, you should further discuss this with your LASIK surgeon during your consultation at Global Laser Vision in San Diego.

Q: Is strabismus, a contraindication to LASIK?

A: Strabismus is a condition of the eye muscles where the there is misalignment of the eyes. Having strabismus is not a contraindication to having LASIK unless the condition when corrected with contact lenses leads to double vision when patient is looking directly at the object ahead (primary gaze). During your consultation at Global Laser Vision in San Diego, the doctors will determine if there is double vision at primary gaze and ultimately inform you of your candidacy for LASIK or other Laser Eye Surgeries.

Q: What does PRK stand for?

A: PRK or Photo Refractive Keratotomy is a type of laser vision correction or refractive surgery in which the laser is applied to the surface of the cornea as opposed to underneath a flap. There are both advantages and disadvantages to PRK as compared to LASIK. Your doctor will review with you the option of PRK vs. LASIK during your consultation at Global Laser Vision in San Diego.

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